ISSN 1306-0015 | E-ISSN 1308-6278
Original Article
Assessment of inappropriate antibiotic use in pediatric patients: point-prevalence study
1 Sağlık Bilimleri Üniversitesi, Kayseri Eğitim ve Araştırma Hastanesi, Çocuk Sağlığı ve Hastalıkları Kliniği, Kayseri, Türkiye  
2 Sağlık Bilimleri Üniversitesi, Kayseri Eğitim ve Araştırma Hastanesi, Çocuk İntaniye Bölümü, Kayseri, Türkiye  
3 Sağlık Bilimleri Üniversitesi, Kayseri Eğitim ve Araştırma Hastanesi, Çocuk Hematoloji Bölümü , Kayseri, Türkiye  
Turk Pediatri Ars ; : -
DOI: 10.5152/TurkPediatriArs.2017.5644
Key Words: Antibiotic, point-prevalence study, inappropriate antibiotic use
Abstract

Aim: This study aimed to determine inappropriate antibiotic use in a children hospital by using point-surveillance method.

 

Materials and methods: Hospitalized 113 patients were included in the study at study day.  In all patients included, data regarding age, gender, antibiotic use, type and dose of antibiotic if used, multiple antibiotic use, presence or absence of consultation with infectious disease specialist before initiation of antibiotic, form of antibiotic use (empirical, targeted or prophylactic), and reason for antibiotic use were recorded. Inappropriate antibiotic use was determined by an infectious disease specialist.

 

Results: The rate of antibiotic use was 70.8%. Of the patients receiving antibiotics, 43% were using more than one antibiotic. It was found that 73.7% of antibiotics were prescribed for empiric purposes and 14.3% for targeted therapy whereas 12% were prescribed for prophylactic purposes. The rate of inappropriate antibiotic use was 33.8% among patients who were given antibiotics. Unnecessary antibiotic prescription was the most common cause for inappropriate antibiotic use (51.9%); followed by unnecessary multiple antibiotic use (29.6%), inaccurate dosing (11.1%), use of broader spectrum than required (7.4%) and use of antibiotics with narrower spectrum than needed (3.7%). The rate of inappropriate antibiotic use was significantly lower in antibiotics requiring confirmation by infectious disease specialist (6.7%) than those not requiring confirmation (26.3%; p=0.023). The rate of inappropriate antibiotic use was significantly lower in antibiotics prescribed by infectious disease specialists (%8.6) than those prescribed by other clinicians (26.5%, p=0.027).

 

 

Conclusion: Antibiotic use based on consultation with infectious disease specialist was a parameter that decreased inappropriate antibiotic use.

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