Year: 2010 Month: 6 Volume: 45 Issue 2
Original Article
Year: 2010
Month: 6
Valume: 45
Issue 2
Viewed 381 times
Received
Accepted
The effect of early parenteral amino acids, on growth and neurodevelopment of very low birth weight infants - Original Article
Doi: 10.4274/tpa.45.111
Fatma Karakuş;
Kocaeli Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi, Çocuk Sağlığı ve Hastalıkları Anabilim Dalı, Kocaeli, Türkiye
Gülcan Türker;
Kocaeli Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi, Çocuk Sağlığı ve Hastalıkları Anabilim Dalı, Neonatoloji Bilim Dalı, Kocaeli, Türkiye
Ayşe Sevim Gökalp;
Kocaeli Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi, Çocuk Sağlığı ve Hastalıkları Anabilim Dalı, Neonatoloji Bilim Dalı, Kocaeli, Türkiye
Mailing Address
Fatma Karakuş;
Kocaeli Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi, Çocuk Sağlığı ve Hastalıkları Anabilim Dalı, Kocaeli, Türkiye
Abstract

Summary
Aim: To assess the effect of early parenteral amino acids, on growth and neurodevelopment of very low birth weight infants at 36 weeks’ postmenstrual age and 18 months’ corrected age.                
Material and Method:  Infants who received ≥3 gr/kg per day of parenteral amino acids within the first 5 days of life were considered early group; infants who receive <3 gr/kg per day of parenteral amino acids within the first 5 days of life were considered late group. Infants’ weight, length and head circumference were measured et 36 weeks’ of postmenstrual age and 18 months’ of corrected age. Nerodevelopmental index was evaluated by “Bayley Scales of Infant Development”.
Results: There were no statistically differences between the early and late amino acid groups in baseline characteristics; except birth weight. At 36 weeks’ postmenstrual age and 18 months’ corrected age, there were no statistically differences in weight, length and head circumference between the two groups. In the early group, female babies had bigger head circumference than male babies at 36 weeks’ postmenstrual age and 18 months’ corrected age. There were no other observed differences between boys or girls. There were no differences between two groups for neurodevelopmental impairment by Bayley mental and psychomotor developmental index. 
Conclusions: On evaluation of head circumferences at 36 weeks’ postmenstrual age and 18 months’ corrected age, it is shown that the low birth weight early group catch-up with the late group and girls in the early group have bigger head circumference therefore it is suggested that early aminoacid supplementation may have positive effect on growth and neurodevelopmental impact. (Turk Arch Ped 2010; 45: 111-8)
Key words: Premature infant, early parenteral amino acid, premature growth,  neurodevelopment 

 

Full Text

Summary
Aim: To assess the effect of early parenteral amino acids, on growth and neurodevelopment of very low birth weight infants at 36 weeks’ postmenstrual age and 18 months’ corrected age.                
Material and Method:  Infants who received ≥3 gr/kg per day of parenteral amino acids within the first 5 days of life were considered early group; infants who receive <3 gr/kg per day of parenteral amino acids within the first 5 days of life were considered late group. Infants’ weight, length and head circumference were measured et 36 weeks’ of postmenstrual age and 18 months’ of corrected age. Nerodevelopmental index was evaluated by “Bayley Scales of Infant Development”.
Results: There were no statistically differences between the early and late amino acid groups in baseline characteristics; except birth weight. At 36 weeks’ postmenstrual age and 18 months’ corrected age, there were no statistically differences in weight, length and head circumference between the two groups. In the early group, female babies had bigger head circumference than male babies at 36 weeks’ postmenstrual age and 18 months’ corrected age. There were no other observed differences between boys or girls. There were no differences between two groups for neurodevelopmental impairment by Bayley mental and psychomotor developmental index. 
Conclusions: On evaluation of head circumferences at 36 weeks’ postmenstrual age and 18 months’ corrected age, it is shown that the low birth weight early group catch-up with the late group and girls in the early group have bigger head circumference therefore it is suggested that early aminoacid supplementation may have positive effect on growth and neurodevelopmental impact. (Turk Arch Ped 2010; 45: 111-8)
Key words: Premature infant, early parenteral amino acid, premature growth,  neurodevelopment 

 


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